Thursday, May 25, 2017

labouradv

Background
Productivity Centre of Kenya, established in September, 2002 by tripartite partners comprising Government (MLSSS), Employers (Federation of Kenya Employer) and Workers (Central Organization of Trade Union (COTU)) as company limited by guarantee. Its establishment was born out of the 7th National Development Plan framework (1997-2001) which emphasized the need for productivity gain used in wage negotiation, subsequent wage guidelines promulgations and social partners need to embrace and inculcate a productivity culture in the national psyche. Recently, the Centre was re-established as government department with the former Ministry of Labour. It is the National Productivity Organization (NPO) mandated for promoting productivity practices in Kenya in order to enhance the nation’s competitiveness.
We achieve this mandate through providing consultancy services to Kenyan companies and organizations both from public and private sectors on Kaizen, a key Japanese management technique (now adopted all over Asian Countries) through the implementation of Kaizen tools such as ‘5S’, ‘Just in time’, ‘Lean management’ and ‘Visualization’ among others. PCK also trains trainers and consultants to provide similar services and popularizing the importance of the Kaizenactivities.
PCK collaborates with world bodies that include Japan Productivity Centre, Japan International Cooperation Agency (J1CA), South Africa’s Productivity Organization and the Asian Productivity organisation to build the capacity of our consultants.

Our Vision: To be a centre of excellence for productivity management in Kenya

Mission: To promote best practices in the public and private sectors and enhance factor productivity and competitiveness

Our mandate is to:

  • Stimulate a positive social and attitudinal environment
  • Promote productivity improvement and culture
  • Drive national productivity and quality movement
  • Network with other relevant institutions and NPOs for support and national development
  • Develop policy and regulatory framework conducive for productivity enhancement

 
  • Spearhead productivity movement in the country and ensure a paradigm shift to performance management
  • Provide a forum for promoting and sharing ideas and experiences on strategies, techniques and practices for productivity practices, accelerated economic growth and social development
  • Encourage and nurture the development of productivity culture in Kenya
  • Facilitate labour –management consultations
  • Initiate productivity schemes and pioneer productivity improvement
  • Acquire, processing and disseminating relevant productivity information
  • Influences areas pertaining policy (as policy trigger)
 
 
Consultancy Services
PCK provides consultation services to companies and organizations, both public and private on Kaizen, a key Japanese management technique (now adopted all over Asian Countries) through the implementation of Kaizen tools such as ‘5S’, ‘Just in time’, ‘Lean management’, ‘Visualization’, ‘Industrial Engineering’, ‘Quality Circles’, ‘Employee Suggestion Scheme’ among others.

Training Services

Some of the training courses offered include:

Course title

Course objective

Target group

Course title

Productivity improvement through quality work environment

To implement good housekeeping techniques through 5S

All employees

Trainers of trainers or consultants

Productivity improvement through quality work environment

TQM for productivity improvement

To equip participants to understand total quality management so that they can make Quality and Continuous Business Improvement work to best effect in their organization

Middle management, Individuals, Managers

TQM for productivity improvement

Promoting Employee Involvement using Quality Circles

To implement the concepts of quality circles in the workplace to institutionalize mechanism for productive and participative problem solving interaction among the employees of an organization

All employees

Promoting Employee Involvement using Quality Circles

Improving productivity through waste elimination

Increase productivity by identifying and eliminating different type of waste in the work environment

All employees

Improving productivity through waste elimination

TPM: Total Productive Maintenance

Maximizing operational efficiency of equipment s  proactive and preventative maintenance

1)    Machine operators

2)    Maintenance workers

TPM: Total Productive Maintenance

 
We also train trainers and consultants to provide similar services and popularizing the importance of the kaizen techniques.
For more information about our services and how to get them, please contact us via e-mail, telephone or visit our offices.
 
 
 
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
What is the PCK?
PCK is a government department under the Ministry of Labour Social Services & Security mandated to promote productivity practices in Kenya.
 
When was the PCK established?
Productivity Centre of Kenya, was established in September, 2002 by tripartite partners comprising Government (through the then Ministry of Labour, Social Services and Security), Employers (Federation of Kenya Employer) and Workers (Central Organization of Trade Union (COTU)) as company limited by guarantee. Its establishment was born out of the 7th National Development Plan framework (1997-2001) which emphasized the need for productivity gain used in wage negotiation, subsequent wage guidelines promulgations and social partners need to embrace and inculcate a productivity culture in the national psyche. Recently, the Centre was re-established as government department with the former Ministry of Labour and East Africa Affairs.
 
What does the PCK do?
  • Spearhead productivity movement in the country and ensure a paradigm shift to performance management.
  • Provide a forum for promoting and sharing ideas and experiences on strategies, techniques and practices for productivity practices, accelerated economic growth and social development.
  • Encourage and nurture the development of productivity culture in Kenya.
  • Facilitate labour –management  consultations
  • Initiate productivity schemes and pioneer productivity improvement
  • Acquire, processing and disseminating relevant productivity information
  • Influences areas pertaining policy (as policy trigger)
 
Why does the PCK promote productivity?
  • The PCK promotes productivity because it is one of the keys to achieving sustainable socioeconomic development.
 
How does the PCK promote productivity?
  • By stimulating a positive social and attitudinal environment
  • Promoting productivity improvement and culture through productivity consultancy services and promotions 
  • By driving national productivity and quality movement
  • By networking with other relevant institutions  and other National Productivity Organizations  for support  and national development
  • By developing policy and regulatory framework conducive for productivity enhancement
 
What is productivity?
It is a measure of how efficiently and effectively a business or an economy uses inputs produce outputs (i.e. how well resources are used to produce output). Where, efficiency means doing things right the first time and effectiveness as doing the right thing.Productivity is, above all, a state of mind where one seeks the continuous improvement of what exists. It is a confidence that one can do better today than yesterday, and that tomorrow will be better than today.
 
What is Kaizen?
Japanese management technique that means continuous improvement and it involves everyone in the organization from top management, to managers then to supervisors, and to workers. It is an activity seeking to improve productivity by utilizing existing resources. This philosophy assumes that ‘our way of life – be it our working life, our social life or our home life – deserves to be constantly improved’
 
How does Kaizen improve productivity of an organization?
Kaizen advocates for continual small improvements that add up to major benefits that result in improved productivity, improved quality, better safety, faster delivery, lower costs, and greater customer satisfaction.The three pillars of Kaizen that are instrumental in improving productivity are:
  • Quality Work Environment (Housekeeping )
  • Waste elimination
  • Standardization
 
What is 5S?
5S is a Japaneseworkplace philosophy which is an acronym for five Japanese words: Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu and Shitsuke and they represent the five steps for a systematic technique for good housekeeping. It is a structured and disciplined method of organising and running the workplace, be it a factory or an office or a service sector activity for improved productivity, safety, quality at reduced cost and higher efficiency.

What are these 5 "S" words and what do they mean?

S/No

Japanese

English

Corresponding

1. 

Seiri

Sort

Distinguish between necessary and unnecessary items. Remove the latter

2. 

Seiton

Set in order

Enforce the dictum ‘a place for everything and everything in its place’

3. 

Seiso

Shine

Clean up the workplace and look for ways to keep it clean

4. 

Seiketsu

Standardize

Maintain and monitor adherence to the first three Ss

5. 

Shitsuke

Sustain

Follow the rule to keep the workplace 5S-right. Hold the gain

 

What are the benefits of 5S?

  • Freeing of work space for productive work -- in cities where Office space is extremely costly, this means a significant monetary saving.
  • Reduction in search time of documents and other items (A 5S office is expected to retrieve any document in less than one minute!)
  • As a result of the above, much faster response times to Customer Requests
  • Visible and distinctive improvement in House keeping
  • Significant reduction in throughput time of production and despatch
  • Reduction in number and duration of machine breakdowns
  • Reduction in material handling damages
  • Reduction in product rejections caused by a dirty environment
  • Generation of a much "safer" and more "hygienic" working environment
  • Significant reduction in loss due to damage and misplacement in storage
  • Reduction in consumption of consumables
  • Tremendous improvement in morale of the entire workforce and a healthy build - up of "pride" in one's work-place
What does it cost to implement 5S?
There are two kinds of costs to 5S implementation:
  • The professional fees of the consultant which depends on the duration of the assignment the fee structure of the consultant
  • The current condition of the Unit where 5S is being implemented which may call for corrective action, as identified by the 5S exercise. These costs typically relate to:
    1. Repair / Modification / New Procurement of shelves, racks, storage systems
    2. Cleaning / Overhauling / Painting / Polishing of equipment
    3. Repairs of various kinds of leakage
    4. Repair / replacement / new procurement of fire fighting equipment and other safety items like Goggles, Safety shoes, Gloves, Ear Plugs etc.
    5. Labelling / Making of Direction & Location Boards
    6. Cost of temporary manpower required to be hired from outside for the initial task of sorting/segregating, which at the start of the exercise is usually a major effort and cannot be done by the employees in the course of their regular work; of course, such work needs to be closely supervised and monitored by the company employees and subsequently, personally carried out by them, on their own. However, for the initial effort, some temporary additional manpower needs to be budgeted for.
When does a 5S implementation exercise get over?
5S activities NEVER get over. It is a continuous input that the organisation must carry on with, forever. If it stops, because of a “sense of having achieved a lot” then things will soon slide back to their original condition. The beauty of 5S is that as you continue to with it, every day you will identify a new possibility of improvement and up gradation; this is what will enable you to add distance between you and your nearest competition and since competition never ends, neither does 5S.

What is waste?
Waste is, in fact, the opposite of value. Therefore waste is whatever feature or functionality or process step that neither adds value nor is used will be considered waste and should be eliminated from the system/product/process.

What are some the common wastes in a workplace?
  • Inventory: Unfinished goods (also called as "work in progress," or WIP)
  • Overproduction: Producing more than the demand requires
  • Extra processing: Additional steps in the process that aren't really needed
  • Transportation: Shipping the goods from one place to the other
  • Waiting: Lag between process steps
  • Motion: Moving around within the process
  • Defects: Flaws in the deliverables that impact their features/functionality

What is Standardization?
In the daily management of the company’s resources (manpower, machine/equipment, methods, information and materials) requires standards. Standards refers to the best way to do the job, namely, a set of policies, rules, directives and procedures established by management for all operations, which serve as guidelines that enable all employees to perform their jobs to assure good results. Therefore, standardization is the documentation of the best way to do a job.
Every time problems or irregularities arise during the daily management of the company’s/organization’s resources, the manager/supervisor must investigate, identify the root cause and revise existing standards or implement new ones to prevent recurrence.


 
 
Contacts
Physical Location
KIRDI Complex
Popo Road, Off Mombasa Road, South C
Address: P.O. Box 5078 – 00200, Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254-20-600537
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

 

Background
Productivity Centre of Kenya, established in September, 2002 by tripartite partners comprising Government (MLSSS), Employers (Federation of Kenya Employer) and Workers (Central Organization of Trade Union (COTU)) as company limited by guarantee. Its establishment was born out of the 7th National Development Plan framework (1997-2001) which emphasized the need for productivity gain used in wage negotiation, subsequent wage guidelines promulgations and social partners need to embrace and inculcate a productivity culture in the national psyche. Recently, the Centre was re-established as government department with the former Ministry of Labour. It is the National Productivity Organization (NPO) mandated for promoting productivity practices in Kenya in order to enhance the nation’s competitiveness.
We achieve this mandate through providing consultancy services to Kenyan companies and organizations both from public and private sectors on Kaizen, a key Japanese management technique (now adopted all over Asian Countries) through the implementation of Kaizen tools such as ‘5S’, ‘Just in time’, ‘Lean management’ and ‘Visualization’ among others. PCK also trains trainers and consultants to provide similar services and popularizing the importance of the Kaizenactivities.
PCK collaborates with world bodies that include Japan Productivity Centre, Japan International Cooperation Agency (J1CA), South Africa’s Productivity Organization and the Asian Productivity organisation to build the capacity of our consultants.
Our Vision
To be a centre of excellence for productivity management in Kenya
Mission
To promote best practices in the public and private sectors and enhance factor productivity and competitiveness
Our mandate is to:
Stimulate a positive social and attitudinal environment
Promote productivity improvement and culture
Drive national productivity and quality movement
Network with other relevant institutions and NPOs for support and national development
Develop policy and regulatory framework conducive for productivity enhancement

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Contact Us

Ministry of East African Community(EAC), Labour and Social Protection
Bishops Road, Social Security House
P.O. Box 40326 - 00100, Nairobi
Telephone: +254 (0) 2729800
Fax: +254 020 2726497
Email: principalsecretary@labour.go.ke. or info@labour.go.ke